"The Nuremberg principles - adopted by a U.N. commission after World War II in response to the Nazis' crimes, hold that military personnel have a responsibility to resist unlawful orders. They also declare wars of aggression a violation of international law.

"Jeffry House is reliving his past. An American draft dodger who fled to Canada in 1970 (he was number 16 in that year's draft lottery), he is now fighting to persuade the Canadian government to grant refugee status to American deserters.

"In some ways, this is coming full circle for me," says the slightly disheveled, 57-year-old lawyer. "The themes that I thought about when I was 21 years old now are reborn, particularly your obligation to the state when the state has participated in a fraud, when they've deceived you."

A dormant network has been revived, with Vietnam-era draft dodgers and deserters quietly contributing money to support the legal defense of the newest American fugitives. House's strategy is bold: He is challenging the very legality of the Iraq war, based on the Nuremberg principles. Those principles, adopted by a U.N. commission after World War II in response to the Nazis' crimes, hold that military personnel have a responsibility to resist unlawful orders. They also declare wars of aggression a violation of international law.